Photo above: Keen volunteers at our April 2021 induction session. Photographer: Karen Davis (front).

It was at the first induction session since going into a state of lockdown, that fifteen new volunteers were welcomed into the Ark family for a day of field work training. This was a fabulous turnout of new recruits – we’re heartened that so many are keen to be involved with Ark and help to care for our ngahere.  An interest in trapping (inspired perhaps by the Predator Free movement) informed a focus on predator trapping at this induction session, so trapline teams with vacancies rejoicefully trained reinforcements are on handStudents from Auckland University Tramping Club, West Auckland locals, and residents from parts of Auckland as far as the North Shore made up the group, which is testament to the power of word of mouth, and of the support for conservation work in Aotearoa. 

Induction sessions will be run monthly, so if you’ve not yet attended let us know.  We also welcome the passing on of skills & knowledge from those with experience to those wanting to learn, so if you have something you’d like to share (for example, botany of the Waitākere Rangeshistory of the Ark, or trapping tips and tricks) please feel free to accompany us – we would love to have you there to inspire new volunteers with your stories. 

A celebration of Ark family, of new volunteers, and of being back in the field again was realised with BBQ lunch afterwardfeaturing sausages, soup and cake. We hope to have more of these – coming together, feasting and relaxing provides heart and soul to the solid backbone of field work at Ark, and it’s wonderful to connect with fellow volunteers in a social way. A huge thank you to all those that provided home baking and cooking on the day – our cooks and bakers are very valued volunteers!

 

New volunteer Karen shares her story from the day: “The induction on the 24th was fantastic. It was awesome to spend the day in some amazing Waitākere bush hanging out with like minded people and getting to learn about how to work the bait lines. I’m really looking forward to my first volunteering session and future ones where I will get to learn about trapping and bird monitoring too. It feels great to know that I will be doing my part to protect and help preserve the native birds of this beautiful country.”
Photo (right): Ark in the Park stream with native vegetation. Photographer: Karen Davis.

Ark in the Park is located in the Waitākere Ranges, which are currently closed to minimise the spread of kauri dieback disease.