Frequently Asked Questions

Photo by Jacqui Geux

Visting Ark in the Park

Can I visit Ark in the Park?

No — Ark in the Park is located in the Waitākere Ranges, which are currently closed to minimise the spread of kauri dieback disease.

Kauri dieback disease

What is kauri dieback disease and what causes it?

Kauri dieback disease infects kauri trees (Agathis australis), which are endemic to the upper North Island and form a major part of Ark in the Park’s forest ecosystem. The disease is fatal and there is no known cure. It is caused by a tiny spore that lives in soil, which may be spread around tracks in mud or dirt on people’s shoes.

More info on www.kauridieback.co.nz.

Why are tracks closed?
In December 2017, Te Kawerau ā Maki placed a rāhui (customary closure) on forested areas in the Waitākere Ranges. This prevents people from entering the area until kauri dieback disease is under controlled.

This was followed by a Controlled Area Notice from the Ministry for Primary Industries. This is an enforceable mechanism under the Biosecurity Act to control the movement of materials that may cause a biosecurity risk, in this case visible soil.

Are any tracks in the Waitākere Ranges open?
Most tracks in the Waitākere Ranges remain closed to prevent the spread of kauri dieback disease. There are some exceptions, but an active Controlled Area Notice means there are certain things you must do when visiting these areas.

For a full list of what tracks are open, please visit the Auckland Council website.

Is research being done on kauri dieback disease?
Yes — research into kauri dieback disease is ongoing. Scientists are exploring ways to reduce the impact of kauri dieback, such as disease resistance in seedlings, the effectiveness of disinfectants and boosting the natural defences of trees.

For a full overview of the scientific research being done on kauri dieback disease, please visit the Kauri Dieback Programme website.

What is Ark in the Park doing to prevent the spread of kauri dieback?
Kauri in the Waitākere Ranges started dying in 2006 and the appropriate authorities started investigating the cause.

Ark in the Park immediately established hygiene procedures to reduce the spread of disease, based on advice from the Ministry for Primary Industries and Auckland Council.

We have a standard operating procedure that all staff and volunteers follow to minimise the spread of kauri dieback disease while carrying out vital conservation work.

Can I still get involved as a volunteer?
Yes — our volunteers are specially trained in minimising the spread of kauri dieback disease. This is guided by our standard operating procedure.

Ark in the Park is located in the Waitākere Ranges, which are currently closed to minimise the spread of kauri dieback disease.