Progress and Plans

Ark Operational Documents

In February 2014 representatives of Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand and of the Auckland Council signed a new Partnership Agreement. The agreement includes the establishment of a new Governance Group, a new joint Management Committee, and an Ark Forum.

Forest and Bird representatives on the Governance Group are Robert Woolf and John Staniland, and on the Management Group are John Sumich and Annalily van den Broeke. Volunteer representatives on the Management Group are Karen Colgan and Chris Chadwick.

Click [here] to access a copy of the Partnership Agreement.

The intended path for Ark future operations is currently described in the 5 Year Plan 2016-2021. Click [here] to access this plan. The plan coversthe operational side of the project including: volunteer and project management, communication, funding etc.

The activities of Ark in the Park are also directed according to theArk in the Park Restoration Plan. You can download a copy byclicking [here].

(The Restoration Plan file size is 5MB; if you prefer a smaller version, with less clear graphics, click [here])

This 57 page document provides the ecological background, current and future plans for the project. Our next task is to work on an Ark in the Park Management Plan that will

A further key document is our Pest Control and Biodiversity Outcomes 2008 -2010. This describes the Ark activities over the period, and was presented to the Auckland Regional Council Parks and Heritage Committee in August 2010. To download the report (7MB, Word document) [click here]. A 4.5MB pdf file with slightly less clear graphics, can also be downloaded [click here].

These documents are designed to add to/update our original Strategic Plan and Operational Plans, which were completed back in 2002.

The project would really appreciate any feedback or comments you would like to make.

Ark Stats

Start date: 2002

Current area: 2200 hectares

Bait stations: 4475 bait stations, 50m apart, adding up to over 200km of bait lines.

Mustelid traps: 375 traps. Catch for the 12 months ending June 2015: 116 stoats, 33 weasels, 4 ferrets, 7 hedgehogs, 648 rats.

Volunteer hours:Volunteers make the project the success it is. We estimate the volunteer time that goes into the project to be around 8000 hrs/year

Rat density before predator control started: approximately 70% presence in monitoring tunnels

Rat density at present time: around 5%

Species re-introduced:whitehead (55 in 2004, 51 in 2008, 50 in 2011, 97 in 2012, 100 in 2014), North Island robin (53 in 2005, 30 in 2009), hihi (59 in 2007, 60 in May 2008), kokako (twenty-six birds released in Ark in the Park since 2009 with 18 accounted for during the 2011-12 season in or near the Ark).

3 -7 confirmedkokakofledglings in 2010-11 and 2011-12. This is the first breeding of kokako in the Waitakere Ranges for 80 years.

Translocation and Breeding Reports:

There are a number of reports available regarding the releases of the species listed above, and also of the subsequent breeding seasons. These reports can be accessed below; copies with higher quality graphics area are available on request, from the Project Manager:

Whitehead:

Whitehead translocation 2004: click here to download (PDF file)

Whitehead translocation 2008:click hereto download (PDF file)

Whitehead translocation 2012: click here to download (PDF file)

Whitehead translocation 2013; click here to download (PDF file)

Whitehead translocation 2014: click here to download (PDF file)

Whitehead translocation 2015:click hereto download (PDF file)

Whitehead translocation 2016; click here todownload (PDF file)

North Island Robin:

Robin translocation 2005: click here to download (PDF file)

Robin breeding season report 2006-2007: click here to view in your browser

Robin breeding season report 2008-2009: click here to download (PDF file)

Robin breeding season report 2009-2010:click hereto download (PDF file)

Robin breeding season report 2010-2011: click here to download (PDF file)

Robin breeding season report 2011-2012:click hereto download (PDF file)

Robin breeding season report 2012-2013:click hereto download (PDF file)

Kokako:

Kokako season 2011-12: click here to download (PDF file)

Kokako season 2012-13; click here to download (Word file)

Kokako Breeding Season Report 2013-14; click here to download (PDF file)

Kokako Breeding Season Report 2014-2015; click here to download (PDF file)

Kokako Breeding Season Report 2015;click hereto download (PDF file)

Kokako census report 2016; click here to download

Hihi:

Hihi breeding season 2008-2009: click here to download (PDF file)

POSTSCRIPT: after these two years when the hihi population flourished, 2009 saw a sudden disappearance of all but a few males. By 2010 all sightings had ceased. Possible explanations include dispersal into non-protected areas, predation of the females in their tree cavity nests, and the fragility of a small population. See the statement by the Ark Project Manager for more details.

What's Next?

The next plannedre-introductionis of karariki (New Zealand parakeet).

Next: Getting to the Ark

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